News

Clinic limit set at $2.25-million

Kincardine council has a message for Parkin Architects: You have $2.25-million to make the clinic addition work.

Councillors and municipal staff discussed the municipality’s instructions to the architects in charge of designing the new building during committee-of-the-whole Oct. 15. The architects are meeting with council Nov. 3, and the municipality wanted to agree on guidelines for the project well ahead of the face-to-face meeting.

Last month, Parkin Architects presented a preliminary design to council with a price tag in upwards of $5-million. Council was expecting the project to cost no more than $2-million or $3-million.


Ben Lobb elected in Huron-Bruce

Voter turnout higher here than nationally

After 15 years of Liberal representation, Huron-Bruce is sending a Conservative to Ottawa.

Ben Lobb won Tuesday night’s election over main rival, Greg McClinchey, with ease. Lobb took 44 per cent of the vote, while McClinchey only mustered 33 per cent.

In total, Lobb earned 22,202 votes, just fewer than 6,000 more than McClinchey, who took over the Liberal candidacy from incumbent Paul Steckle.


Pudding cup blinds driver

A Kincardine motorist was “blinded” by a flying pudding cup Oct. 3.

South Bruce OPP say the 37-year-old man was southbound on Highway 21 in Kincardine Township at about 3:30 p.m. when a pudding cup was thrown from a northbound school bus.

The pudding cup exploded when  it hit the driver’s  windshield, leaving him unable to see through his windshield.

Police say an act of this nature is a criminal offence.  In the past, police have laid mischief charges and placed conditions on the student involved. Such mischief could lead to an accident, causing injury or loss of life. Police ask that parents tell their children of the consequences of senseless acts of mischief.

The current case is under investigation, say police.


Termites enjoy Curling Club

The Kincardine Curling Club has long been enjoyed by many – including the local termite population.

The curling club, located on Kincardine Avenue, is undergoing major repairs after serious termite damage was found on the structure’s north side.

Five major laminated wood support beams on the north side are  being replaced with steel beams at a cost of $10,000, said Kincardine Curling Club president Jim Prenger. The money will come from the curling club’s reserve funds.

Steel siding was put on the building about four years ago, said Prenger. Last year there was evidence of termite damage. This summer some of the steel siding was removed and severe damage found.


Lucknow could be country music capital

Some of North America’s biggest country music acts could be invading Lucknow next summer.

The Lucknow Kinsmen unveiled their preliminary plan for a one-day, four-band concert tentatively scheduled for Lucknow next August. The plan is to raise money for a yet-unnamed community project and support the Kinsmen’s long-standing fundraising for Cystic Fibrosis research.


Thirty years of turkey pies

They come for the pies.

Turkey pies to be exact – more than 2,200 were on sale at Saturday’s Kountry Kitchen Bazaar at the Point Clark Community Centre. This year marked the 30th consecutive bazaar and the yearly tradition shows no signs of slowing down.

“It’s the turkey pies that bring people here, but we give great value on everything for your money,” says organizer Jan Kelly. “The vendors and the variety make it a well-known success.”

Kountry Kitchen Bazaar volunteers Marion Donnelly, left, and Sheila Murray hold two of the many pies on sale Saturday morning at the Pine River Community Centre. (Kiel Edge photo)


Andy Robinson rocking council's boat

Andy Robinson’s presentation to Kincardine council Oct. 1 began with a strict warning from his audience.

Councillor Ken Craig came to the defense of municipal staff and said he wouldn’t take part in the discussion if Robinson continued to slag on Kincardine’s employee. At the last council meeting in September, Robinson had harsh words for CAO John deRosenroll and members of the Kincardine Yacht Club.

“I’d love to work towards a resolution,” Craig said, before Robinson began. “But, I won’t be involved in this if (Robinson’s presentation) involves disparaging words about staff or community volunteers.”


Kincardine council sticks with sidewalk plan near KDSS

Despite objections from neighbourhood residents, a road reconstruction project near KDSS will include sidewalks.

Council voted 6-3 in favour of including sidewalks on Charles, William and South Streets. The municipality also awarded the tender for the reconstruction project to Omega Contracting, at a total cost of $1,820,725.

Kincardine’s public works committee met several times with concerned residents to adjust the plans for the large road project. Special attention was given to minimizing the amount of private property that will be lost to road widening and the safety of residents and high school students alike.


French immersion blooms at Elgin Market

With enough students to fill a pair of classrooms in just its second year, Elgin Market’s French immersion program can be considered nothing if not successful.

“We’re not surprised at all,” says principal Anne Roppel. “At our first information meeting (last year) we had a lot of parents interested in the program.”

The first year of the program began in September, 2007. The school had approximately 25 students enrolled and offered a split class of junior and senior kindergarten.

This year, the first group of students are a year older, allowing for a Senior kindergarten and Grade 1 split class. The school also welcomed 22 new Junior Kindergarten students, bringing the program’s total enrollment to 47.


Business as usual at Pharmasave

Gordon’s Pharmasave is changing hands at the end of the month, but customers shouldn’t see many changes to Kincardine’s only downtown drug store.

Ron and Marla Chapleau have confirmed that they have sold the business to a pair of businessmen. After more than two years of working seven-days-a-week, the Chapleaus decided it was time for a change.

“We’re hopefully going to keep working here; just a little less often,” Ron said Wednesday. “We’re finding a balance between being pharmacists and being parents, with more (emphasis) on the parent side.”

The couple has young children and realized this was an excellent time to cut back on their hours of work. The new owners are looking for someone to come in and take over the day-to-day management of the pharmacy.