Huron-Kinloss council has two options for budget

Huron-Kinloss council is split on two options for the 2009 tax rate following a budget meeting early last week.

Council is considering two different tax rates, the options mean a difference of $26 on the average municipal tax bill.

The first option would result in a two per cent decrease in the total tax rate. The total tax rate includes the education, Bruce County and municipal tax rates. Although the total tax rate would be lowered, the municipal rate would increase 1.76 per cent. For owners of homes worth the median assessment of $200,000, this option would mean a $120 increase in taxes this year.


Chamber presents community achievement awards

Dwight Willet presents the Bruce Power Citizen of the Year Award to Shirley Burnham


A haircut for cancer

Morgan Colling, 8, holds up the hair she is donating to Locks of Love, which makes wigs for cancer patients. Colling, a Ripley Central School student, had her hair chopped off Friday afternoon at Dynamics hair salon in Kincardine. The hair is headed for the Continental Hair Program ofr Kids in Toronto.


Local metal band signs deal, will play East Coast tour

Odium releases debut CD

Odium, a local heavy metal band, has signed with Year of the Sun Records, and will tour the East Coast come July.

Kincardine’s Dale Burrows plays bass and sings back-up vocals for the up-and-coming group, which released its debut CD, At The Bottom, two weeks ago. Tom Emmans, who works at Presto-Crest in Kincardine, sings lead vocals. Bo Louther and Andrew Fullerton play guitar and Joe Mullen is on the drums.

“These guys have had to really work for everything, and I really think Odium has the potential to become pretty huge in coming years,” said Year of the Sun president Chris Benn. “Odium is quite possibly the best band you’ve never heard of.”


Kincardine going to the dogs

Group pushes for town dog park - now

Kincardine’s dog owners want the municipality’s help in setting up an off-leash dog park for their furry companions.

KinDog representative Jacqueline Faubert made a presentation to council Mar. 18 showing the benefits for both dogs and owners in creating a park.

“This is all about the dogs,” Faubert said. “But it’s also more about the people and this community.”

The group is looking for suitable land to use for a dog park within the next year. The ideal park, according to the presentation, would be at least one acre of land surrounded by a four foot or six foot fence. A double-gated entry is recommended and ample space for shade and water should be considered.


It's a dog's life

It’s sad but true. For many couples, dogs are more important than children.

Some dog owners believe their pets can take the place of children.

Why have a child when you can treat a dog like your kid?

That’s why we have stores for dogs, doggy day care, dog whisperers, dog sitting services. Dogs are a big expense for some people.

Which brings us to the dog park that a group in Kincardine would like council to set up.

There are apparently 1,500 dog parks in North America so Kincardine is perhaps a little slow getting into the game.

People take their dogs to such parks where they can run loose and socialize with others of their species. I suppose that means a place to freely defecate, fornicate and exercise the olfactory glands. Which raises a serious question: will children need eye cover to gain admittance?

And what about dogs that fight? Will psychopathic dogs be allowed?


Thief gets bolder

Thief getting bolder

It would appear that the crime spree on Lynden Crescent is not over. The thief is now much bolder and has started to remove items in broad daylight.

Just today between 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. someone walked onto my property, almost to my front door and stole today’s Saturday Star newspaper.

If you, thief, are so hard up to read a newspaper you could have come and asked and I would have gladly delivered it to you when I was done with it. Rest assured, theft is theft and when you are caught you will have to pay the penalty.

David Meek


Speech competition

Grade 2 student Patricia Dakin discusses Winnie the Pooh during her speech at Thursday's Speaking Shocase at Elgin Market Public School. The Showcase began Wednesday and parents and students filled the gym to hear each of the student's speak. (Kiel Edge photo)


Never a dull moment for citizen of the year

Shirley Burnham has been busy.

Burnham will be presented with the Bruce Power Citizen of the Year Award Saturday night at a gala dinner at the Best Western Governor’s Inn.

“It’s quite a surprise,” said Burnham Thursday afternoon. “The whole thing is a bit overwhelming. I had to hop on the computer and see exactly what the award was for.”

Citizen of the Year is awarded by the Chamber of Commerce to a person who has demonstrated strong citizenship with outstanding contributions to the community in the past year.

In Burnham’s case, it could be for her contributions over several decades.

 


Connecting the dots

You have to love politicians.

Times might be tough, but at the provincial and federal level there is always money to sprinkle around.

Saturday morning MP Ben Lobb forked over $15,785 to the Kincardine Area Seniors Advisory/Action Committee. The money is to allow the committee to teach seniors how to use the computer.

And that of course, is so much fluff. I’m sure anyone who really wants to learn the computer could do so without the help of KASAAC.

If I ever get the chance to retire, the last thing I want to play with is a computer.

But if the feds want to give away money, Kincardine might as well get its share.

Lobb said the government will be announcing the Rink Program this week to allow communities to make upgrades to existing rinks. Those grants are capped at $1 million per project.

The Davidson Centre would fit right in with that program.